Mark Sweney 

Google vs Australia and the forgotten Facebook lawsuit

Also: Perez Hilton TV | 10 years of blogging | the future of regional newspaper journalism | Second Life loses its mojo for businesses | Seven hand gestures to control your living rioom gadgets
  
  

Also: Perez Hilton TV | 10 years of blogging | the future of regional newspaper journalism | Second Life loses its mojo for businesses | Seven hand gestures to control your living rioom gadgets

The Australian Competition Commission has filed a trading standards lawsuit against Google accusing the search engine giant of not making a clear distinction between paid and 'natural' search results.

The case, which is set to be heard at a preliminary hearing on 21 August, could be a major threat to Google which relies upon the delivery of search-related advertising for its revenues.

It could also set a precedent against other search companies including MSN and Yahoo!

The chappies at search marketing agency Spannerworks dropped us a line on their view arguing the ACCC's claims are "naïve and unfounded".

"The same argument could be made for positioning editorial alongside advertisements in newspapers," argues head of paid search Paul Doleman.

The Facebook lawsuit that won't let Zuckerberg go

Forget multi-billion dollar valuations and speculation that every company under the sun is going to buy Facebook.

What about a long-forgotten lawsuit that threatens Zuckerberg's social networking nirvana?

Matt Marshall at VentureBeat discusses the lawsuit that just won't die here.

The story goes like this. Before launching Facebook at Harvard, Zuckerberg worked for two brothers on a project called harvardConnect.com to - you guessed it - link students and alumni.

Zuckerberg left, made Facebook, and three years ago brothers Cameron and Tyler Winklevoss and Divya Narendra came after him claiming code theft.

They want it shut down and want full control of the site. There is some sort of Federal Court hearing on this later this month.

The future of regional newspaper journalism (maybe)

The launch of online magazine SoGlos.com apparently "marks a new age for regional lifestyle and entertainment journalism".

Targeting Gloucestershire residents and visitors the website has, it says, had international success already for posting a video of the county's annual cheese rolling event.

Brace yourselves.

Perez Hilton coming to a TV near you

Celebrity blogger Perez Hilton is reportedly involved in creating a series of six hour-long episodes of a series called "What Perez Says" on VH1.

Unconfirmed but apparently it was mentioned, says the Hollywood Reporter and Reuters, during an interview on ABC's "The View."

10 (or maybe 11) years of blogs

So this year marks the 10th anniversary of the blog.

GigaOm seems a bit upset that "it took a mainstream pub" - the Wall Street Journal that is - to point out the milestone had been reached.

But wait, it appears we have celebrated a year too late.

According to Duncan Riley the WSJ is "trying to re-write blogging history" and that as of Jan 10 this year blogging is actually 11 years old. This one might run and run...

All is quiet on the Second Life front

The LA Times has reported that brands are pulling out of Second Life because it isn't delivering the crowds.

I must admit I have always been a bit of a sceptic on the ultimate scale Second Life would achieve - last year's hyperbole aside - so I'm not surprised.

However Techcrunch makes some useful points, and links, to comment stating that SecondLife doesn't need business brands anyway.

Grouper Crackles its way to Hollywood

Grouper, the online video website acquired by Sony last year for $65m, is being rebranded and refocused.

Now known as Crackle, Venturebeat say the plan is for it to become a Sony Pictures-backed online talent studio.

According to co-founder Josh Felser it is going to be a "pathway to Hollywood".

And finally...

In the 'just because you can doesn't mean you should' category is perhaps this story about "seven simple hand gestures" that allows you to turn on and off gadgets including TVs and DVD players.

Invented by Australian scientists, apparently, the "wave controller" has a built-in camera that recognises simple hand gestures and can be used to work with eight different gadgets.

Kind of like Wii meets a game of charades?

 

Leave a Comment

Required fields are marked *

*